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Genealogy of Architectural Practices in Singapore [G.A.P.S.]
2nd Edition

FOREWORD

Exactly a decade ago, I found a copy of a genealogy map that was circulating around MKPL Architects’ office, the firm where I started as a young graduate. My inquisitive nature got me so captivated by the map that I began tracing all my favorite architects’ employment history and finding out who they worked for and with whom. A decade on, I find myself contributing to the growth of this map with peers who have set up their practices in the last decade. I may have come full circle with this updated map but the practice landscape continues to grow. 

There are myriad ways our industry and profession has evolved. By quantifying, categorising and indexing some key information of each practice, we begin to see connections, lineages and growth that give us a clearer picture of some aspects of this evolution. Understanding the size of our architectural fraternity in this way, we think, may inflect the way we read the history of Singapore architecture. Like in a family tree, every new family that spawns within is a momentous event.

The staggering number of new practices incorporated in the last decade – 395, as provided by the Board of Architects in August 2022- gives one account of the state of our profession. One way of finding out where they are headed is to find out where they were from. Most, if not all, could call on mentors and practical experience at other firms before charting their own course, as their origin stories. For this reason, we decided on a scroll format that could not only grow but also show the lineages, offshoots and flowering splinters in a chronological order. We hope this format allows the continuous recording of the continuous growth of Singapore’s architecture fraternity. 

I believe in the importance of lineage. Like other disciplines of art, individual growth and mastery stem from and contribute to a healthy diversity of communities of practice. The act of charting the various lineages allows us an overview of our profession – both in its breadth as well as the depth of how far we have come and the road ahead. 

In this new digital version of GAPS 2.0, we have also decided to include the listing of each architect's respective mentors. Collated from information volunteered by individual practitioners, we feel it is a tacit acknowledgement of these even less visible mentor linkages pertinent to the success of these architects in addition to their work mentors. 

The SIA GAPS 2.0 team would like to express our gratitude to Prof Fung John Chye and his team that initiated this project back in 2013. The original map brought numerous delightful insights upon which we built this next working draft. The prompt responses to our many queries during the last year attests to Prof Fung’s generosity, without which no such map – original and current- could be drawn.

On a personal note, I would also like to thank my two staffs Loo Quan Le and Reid Tan as well as SIA secretariat Dinah Qistina for working alongside with me on this arduous project together with Aaron Choo from Vast. Taking this opportunity to also thank the SIA60 committee - Adrian Lai, Wong Ker How, Melvin Tan, Tiah Nan Chyuan, Melvin Keng and Tan Szue Hann for entrusting this meaningful project to me. 

This is only the beginning. Seeing the shoots of a very meaningful picture we hope to reveal to the whole architecture fraternity and society at large, we hope all members are encouraged and excited to participate. We hope to be able to look forward to more contributions from firms to make this project more robust and comprehensive. I personally remain hopeful that this exercise is key to tightening up our community bonds, as a foundation for everything else we are trying to achieve together. 

Lastly, we hope you will enjoy scrolling through this new edition of GAPS 2.0 and like me all those years back, discover and delight in the many bonds we share. 

Stay well. 

Warmest regards,
Lim Shing Hui 
Chairperson for GAPS 2.0

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF USE

Due to the incomplete information gathered when Singapore Institute of Architects sent out the survey form, the Institute seeks our members and the readers understanding for any errors and inaccuracies found on the map. 

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any for or by means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without prior written permission of the author or publisher.

Publisher does not warrant or assume any legal responsibility for the map's content. All information expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the author or the Singapore Institute of Architects. The user of this publication accepts that the information presented herein are compiled from a preliminary survey and unsubstantiated published information and do not constitute expert endorsement or professional advice. The author and publisher have produced this map in good faith and accept no liability, direct or indirect, including consequential loss arising from error or inaccuracy in respect of any decision made by the user of this material based on the contents published herein. The author and publisher have, as far as reasonable, taken care to ensure that the information is accurate. However, users are strongly advised to verify these before quoting the contents. 

THIS MAP IS A WORK-IN-PROGRESS AND MAY CONTAIN ERRORS, INACCURACIES OR OMISSIONS. PLEASE INFORM THE SINGAPORE INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OF ANY CORRECTIONS OR AMENDMENTS VIA THE FEEDBACK FORM.

GENEALOGY OF ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICES IN SINGAPORE [G.A.P.S.]

2ND EDITION

YEAR
1830
1831
1832
1833

1833

1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887

1887

1888
1889
1890

1890

1891
1892

1892

1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

1920

1921
1922
1923

1923

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930

1930

1930s

1930s

1931
1932
1933

1933

1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940

1940s

1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946

1946

1947
1948
1949
1950

1950s

1950s

1950s

1950s

1950s

1950s

1950s

1951
1952

1952

1953
1954
1955

1955

1955

1956

1956

1957

1957

1957

1957

1958
1959
1960

1960s

1 Feb 1960

1960s

1960

1960

1960s

1961

1961

1962
1963

5 Mar 1963

1964

1964

1964

1964

1964 -> 1973

1965

1965

1965

1966
1967

1967

1967

1967

1967

1968

1968

1968

1969

1969

1969

1969

1970

1970s

1970

1970

1970s

1970

1971

1971

1971

1972

1972

1972

1972

1972

1973

1973

1973

1974

1974

1974

1974

17 Dec 1974

1974

1974

1974

1975

1975

1975

1975

1976

1976

1976

1976

1976

1977

1977

1977

1977

1978

1978

1978

1978

1979

1979

1 Nov 1979

1979

1980

1980

1980

1980

1980

1980

1980s

1980

1980s

1980

1981

16 Feb 1981

Curtis Penman Read Williams (New Zealand)

1981

6 Jul 1981

1981

1982

1982

1982

1982

1982

1982

1982

1983

1983

1983

1983

1983

1983

1984

1984

1984

1984

1984

1985

1985

20 Dec 1985

1985

1985

1985

1986

1986

1986

1986

1986

1986

1987

1987

1987

1987

1987

1987

1987

1988

1988

1988

1988

1988

1988

1988

1989

1989

1989

1989

1989

1989

1989

1989

1990

1990s

1990s

1990

1990

19 Jun 1990

1990

31 Jul 1990

1990s

1990s

27 Nov 1990

1990

1990

1990s

1990s

1991

1991

23 Dec 1991

1991

1991

1991

1991

1991

1992

1992

1992

1992

1992

1992

1992 -> 2007

7 Jan 1992

1992

1992

1992

1992

1992

28 Oct 1992

8 Jun 1992

1992

1992

1992

Graham Taylor Designs (Vietnam)
1993

1 Aug 1993

1993